Googolisation

brands

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on November 10, 2009

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from www.fastcompany.com

Razorfish’s FEED Study: Brands Are the New Celebrity

razorfishYou know social media is a powerful tool for business when a grocery store attracts more Twitter followers than pop star Lady Gaga and almost as many as Miley Cyrus, whose departure drove her 2 million fans to make #MileyComeBack a trending topic for more than a day. If Whole Foods Market ever followed suit, its 1.5 million registered fans would surely start a virtual food fight.
That’s a fair assumption to make based on the latest FEED study, anyway, from marketing firm Razorfish, which suggests we’re no longer mere customers, we’re brand fans. We sign on to a brand’s Twitter feed to find out about discounts and deals–44% of consumers cited access to exclusive deals as the main reason they follow–but we stick around for the fun.

Interesting or entertaining” content was the No. 1 reason to follow a brand for 23% of the 1,000 consumers surveyed. And a recent report from Penn State found that 20% of all Tweets mention specific brands or products (Today, for example, “Google Wave” and “Modern Warfare 2” are trending topics on Twitter).

feeed1

The most important take-home from the Razorfish study is that interactions with a brand matter consumers. Of those surveyed, 65% said an online experience with a brand has changed their opinion of that brand, and 97% said that experience influenced whether or not they would purchase an item or service. Those who engage with a brand digitally aren’t just more likely to purchase that brand, they’re more likely to recommend it to their friends.

Most companies are worried that their consumers’ ability to communicate with peers and read user reviews online is crippling the effect of advertising. But Razorfish found that technology isn’t killing advertising–it’s helping it to evolve. Some 69% of consumers provided feedback to a company through social media channels, the company’s Web site, or review sites. These channels are creating two-way communication between brands and their customers.

Think of how you relate to brands today. We’re certainly not the consumers of 10 years ago, or even five years ago. Now we can follow Zappos on Twitter along with 1.5 million others, or be one of Starbucks’ four million Venti Vanilla Bean Frappuccino Blended Creme drinking friends on Facebook..

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And as the interactive nature of digital media evolves from brand “awareness” to “purchase” to “recommendation” in one single experience, there are sure to be some big dollar signs attached if companies take advantage of building on their consumer fan base.

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Twitters quitters

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on October 12, 2009
from www.reuters.com

Many Twitters are quick quitters: study
SYDNEY (Reuters) – Today’s Twitters are often tomorrow’s quitters, according to data that questions the long-term success of the latest social networking sensation used by celebrities from Oprah Winfrey to Britney Spears.
Data from Nielsen Online, which measures Internet traffic, found that more than 60 percent of Twitter users stopped using the free social networking site a month after joining.
“Twitter’s audience retention rate, or the percentage of a given month’s users who come back the following month, is currently about 40 percent,” David Martin, Nielsen Online’s vice president of primary research, said in a statement.
San Francisco-based Twitter was created three years ago as an Internet-based service that could allow people to follow the 140-character messages or “tweets” of friends and celebrities which could be sent to computer screens or mobile devices.

“For most of the past 12 months, pre-Oprah, Twitter has languished below 30 percent retention.”

San Francisco-based Twitter was created three years ago as an Internet-based service that could allow people to follow the 140-character messages or “tweets” of friends and celebrities which could be sent to computer screens or mobile devices.

But it has enjoyed a recent explosion in popularity on the back of celebrities such as actor Ashton Kutcher and U.S. talk show host Oprah Winfrey singing its praises and sending out “tweets” which can alert readers to breaking news or the sender’s sometimes mundane activities.

President Barack Obama used Twitter during last year’s campaign and other prominent celebrities on Twitter include basketballer Shaquille O’Neal and singers Britney Spears and Miley Cyrus.

Twitter, as a private company, does not disclose the number of its users but according to Nielsen Online, Twitter’s website had more than 7 million unique visitors in February this year compared to 475,000 in February a year ago.

But Martin said a retention rate of 40 percent will limit a site’s growth to a 10 percent reach figure over the longer term.

“There simply aren’t enough new users to make up for defecting ones after a certain point,” he said in a statement.

Martin said Facebook and MySpace, the more established social network sites, enjoyed retention rates that were twice as high and those rates only rose when they went through their explosive growth phases.

Both currently have retention rates of about 70 percent with Facebook having about 200 million users.

“Twitter has enjoyed a nice ride over the last few months, but it will not be able to sustain its meteoric rise without establishing a higher level of user loyalty,” said Martin.

(Writing by Belinda Goldsmith, Editing by Miral Fahmy)

Wed Apr 29, 2009 10:52am EDT

nielson

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on October 12, 2009
from blog.nielsen.com

Twitter Quitters Post Roadblock to Long-Term Growth

David Martin, Vice President, Primary Research, Nielsen Online
Oprah embarrassed herself on it with a stuck caps lock. That guy from Punk’d competed with “the most trusted name in news” for audience. A befuddled Jon Stewart shook his fist at it in anger. Let there be no doubt: Twitter has grown exponentially in the past few months with no small thanks to celebrity exposure. People are signing up in droves, and Twitter’s unique audience is up over 100 percent in March. But despite the hockey-stick growth chart, Twitter faces an uphill battle in making sure these flocks of new users are enticed to return to the nest.

Currently, more than 60 percent of U.S. Twitter users fail to return the following month, or in other words, Twitter’s audience retention rate, or the percentage of a given month’s users who come back the following month, is currently about 40 percent. For most of the past 12 months, pre-Oprah, Twitter has languished below 30 percent retention.

Maybe we’re jumping the gun. Twitter is still something of a fledgling, and surely some other sites that eventually lived up to Twitter-like hype suffered from poor retention in the early days. Compare it to the two heavily-touted behemoths of social networking when they were just starting out. Doing so below, we found that even when Facebook and MySpace were emerging networks like Twitter is now, their retention rates were twice as high. When they went through their explosive growth phases, that retention only went up, and both sit at nearly 70 percent today.

SN-loyalty

Twitter has enjoyed a nice ride over the last few months, but it will not be able to sustain its meteoric rise without establishing a higher level of user loyalty. Frankly, if Oprah can’t accomplish that, I’m not sure who can.

YouTube – Computing in the Cloud – Introduction

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on May 4, 2009

YouTube – Greening the Grid through Cloud computing, and Virtualization

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on May 4, 2009

How Microsoft and Yahoo! Let Google Win – The Connected Web

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on May 1, 2009

Reading an article posted by \'Big Switch\' author Nick Carr on Friday, I was reminded of a job interview I had back in the late 1980s. It was at one of the big computer reseller chains of the time, and the interviewer explained to me the company\'s strategy of expanding until it owned the bulk of the distribution channel for business PCs, at which point it would, like Wal-Mart, be more powerful than the PC vendors themselves. I didn\'t take the job. Within a few years, the chain had folded, broken by recession and commoditization. Here\'s what Nick Carr wrote that brought it all back to me:

\"The broader the span of the middleman\'s control over the exchanges that take place in a market, the greater the middleman\'s power and the lesser the power of the suppliers … The reality of the web is hypermediation, and Google, with its search and search-ad monopolies, is the hypermediator.\"

The Connected Web

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on May 1, 2009

Phil Wainewright blogs about how businesses are using the Web to get better plugged into today\'s fast-moving, digital economy.

Rough Type: Nicholas Carr’s Blog

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on April 29, 2009

The biggest crowd on the web today is the one streaming through Twitter\'s entryway. The second biggest crowd on the web today is the one streaming through Twitter\'s exit.

Twitter\'s recent growth has been explosive, even by web standards. The number of Twitter users doubled last month, reaching an estimated 14 million. This month, with Ashton\'s Million Follower March and Oprah\'s First Tweet, the Twitter flock has almost certainly swelled even more quickly. Everybody who\'s anybody is giving Twitter a whirl.

But a whirl does not a relationship make. According to a study out today from Nielsen, at least three out of every five people who sign up for a Twitter account bail within a few weeks:

Currently, more than 60 percent of Twitter users fail to return the following month, or in other words, Twitter's audience retention rate, or the percentage of a given month's users who come back the following month, is currently about 40 percent. For most of the past 12 months, pre-Oprah, Twitter has languished below 30 percent retention.

Nicholas Carr – Google Video

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on April 29, 2009

What the Internet is doing to our brains

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on April 29, 2009
Is Google Making Us Stupid?
by Nicholas Carr

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200807/google

clipped from www.theatlantic.com

Is Google Making Us Stupid?

“Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop, Dave?” So the supercomputer HAL pleads with the implacable astronaut Dave Bowman
in a famous and weirdly poignant scene toward the end of Stanley Kubrick’s
2001: A Space Odyssey
. Bowman, having nearly been sent to a deep-space death by the malfunctioning machine, is calmly, coldly disconnecting the memory circuits that control its artificial “ brain. “Dave, my mind is going,” HAL says, forlornly. “I can feel it. I can feel it.”

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