Googolisation

nielson

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on October 12, 2009
from blog.nielsen.com

Twitter Quitters Post Roadblock to Long-Term Growth

David Martin, Vice President, Primary Research, Nielsen Online
Oprah embarrassed herself on it with a stuck caps lock. That guy from Punk’d competed with “the most trusted name in news” for audience. A befuddled Jon Stewart shook his fist at it in anger. Let there be no doubt: Twitter has grown exponentially in the past few months with no small thanks to celebrity exposure. People are signing up in droves, and Twitter’s unique audience is up over 100 percent in March. But despite the hockey-stick growth chart, Twitter faces an uphill battle in making sure these flocks of new users are enticed to return to the nest.

Currently, more than 60 percent of U.S. Twitter users fail to return the following month, or in other words, Twitter’s audience retention rate, or the percentage of a given month’s users who come back the following month, is currently about 40 percent. For most of the past 12 months, pre-Oprah, Twitter has languished below 30 percent retention.

Maybe we’re jumping the gun. Twitter is still something of a fledgling, and surely some other sites that eventually lived up to Twitter-like hype suffered from poor retention in the early days. Compare it to the two heavily-touted behemoths of social networking when they were just starting out. Doing so below, we found that even when Facebook and MySpace were emerging networks like Twitter is now, their retention rates were twice as high. When they went through their explosive growth phases, that retention only went up, and both sit at nearly 70 percent today.

SN-loyalty

Twitter has enjoyed a nice ride over the last few months, but it will not be able to sustain its meteoric rise without establishing a higher level of user loyalty. Frankly, if Oprah can’t accomplish that, I’m not sure who can.

YouTube – Computing in the Cloud – Introduction

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on May 4, 2009

YouTube – Greening the Grid through Cloud computing, and Virtualization

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on May 4, 2009

How Microsoft and Yahoo! Let Google Win – The Connected Web

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on May 1, 2009

Reading an article posted by \'Big Switch\' author Nick Carr on Friday, I was reminded of a job interview I had back in the late 1980s. It was at one of the big computer reseller chains of the time, and the interviewer explained to me the company\'s strategy of expanding until it owned the bulk of the distribution channel for business PCs, at which point it would, like Wal-Mart, be more powerful than the PC vendors themselves. I didn\'t take the job. Within a few years, the chain had folded, broken by recession and commoditization. Here\'s what Nick Carr wrote that brought it all back to me:

\"The broader the span of the middleman\'s control over the exchanges that take place in a market, the greater the middleman\'s power and the lesser the power of the suppliers … The reality of the web is hypermediation, and Google, with its search and search-ad monopolies, is the hypermediator.\"

The Connected Web

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on May 1, 2009

Phil Wainewright blogs about how businesses are using the Web to get better plugged into today\'s fast-moving, digital economy.

Rough Type: Nicholas Carr’s Blog

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on April 29, 2009

The biggest crowd on the web today is the one streaming through Twitter\'s entryway. The second biggest crowd on the web today is the one streaming through Twitter\'s exit.

Twitter\'s recent growth has been explosive, even by web standards. The number of Twitter users doubled last month, reaching an estimated 14 million. This month, with Ashton\'s Million Follower March and Oprah\'s First Tweet, the Twitter flock has almost certainly swelled even more quickly. Everybody who\'s anybody is giving Twitter a whirl.

But a whirl does not a relationship make. According to a study out today from Nielsen, at least three out of every five people who sign up for a Twitter account bail within a few weeks:

Currently, more than 60 percent of Twitter users fail to return the following month, or in other words, Twitter's audience retention rate, or the percentage of a given month's users who come back the following month, is currently about 40 percent. For most of the past 12 months, pre-Oprah, Twitter has languished below 30 percent retention.

Nicholas Carr – Google Video

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on April 29, 2009

What the Internet is doing to our brains

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on April 29, 2009
Is Google Making Us Stupid?
by Nicholas Carr

http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200807/google

clipped from www.theatlantic.com

Is Google Making Us Stupid?

“Dave, stop. Stop, will you? Stop, Dave. Will you stop, Dave?” So the supercomputer HAL pleads with the implacable astronaut Dave Bowman
in a famous and weirdly poignant scene toward the end of Stanley Kubrick’s
2001: A Space Odyssey
. Bowman, having nearly been sent to a deep-space death by the malfunctioning machine, is calmly, coldly disconnecting the memory circuits that control its artificial “ brain. “Dave, my mind is going,” HAL says, forlornly. “I can feel it. I can feel it.”

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www.williamgibsonbooks.com

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on October 15, 2008
Courtesy of Amazon.com
clipped from www.williamgibsonbooks.com
Amazon.com : How do you research? If you want to write about, say, GPS, like you do in your new book, do you actively research it and seek out experts, or do you just perceive what’s out there and make it your own?

Gibson: Well, I google it and get it wrong [laughter]. Or if I’m lucky, Cory Doctorow tells me I’m wrong but gives me a good fix for it. One of the things I discovered while I was writing Pattern Recognition is that I now think that any contemporary novel today has a kind of Google novel aura around it, where somebody’s going to google everything in the text. So people–and this happened to me with Pattern Recognition–would find my footprints so to speak: well, he got this from here, and this information is on this site.
Amazon.com : You’re annotated out there.
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williamgibsonbooks.com

Posted in Uncategorized by Moe on October 15, 2008
I eventually became exactly the sort of introverted, hyper-bookish boy you’ll find in the biographies of most American science fiction writers, obsessively filling shelves with paperbacks and digest-sized magazines, dreaming of one day becoming a writer myself.
clipped from www.williamgibsonbooks.com

Gibson: It’s not that interesting for me. I’m okay with it because it doesn’t pull me in that much. The thing that limits you with Google is what you can think of to google, really. There’s some kind of personal best limitation on it, unless you get lucky and something you google throws up something you’ve never seen before. You’re still really inside some annotated version of your own head.
Amazon.com : I think for some writers, they’d never get back in the pool with Google open to them.
Amazon.com : Right, instead of being in a bookstore where you can browse and have things come to you, you’re browsing in your own brain.

Gibson: On my internet, the stuff in my bookmarks is like really small. Sometimes too small, crowded. But I sort of stay there.
Amazon.com : That’s your neighborhood.

Gibson: I imagine most people do.
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